The Ring Of Ten Bells

Saint Botolph's ringers logoA brief history of bells at St Botolph's

Bells, Dedication & Inscriptions

Diameter, weight and note

Campanology

The Yorkshire Association Of Change Ringers

Contacts

Ringing Times

Sunday Service 9:30 - 10:00am

Practise Night:  Wednesday 7:15 - 8:45pm

 

A brief history of bells at St Botolph's

One of the earliest references to bells in St Botolph's Church is that of Tubular Bells given to the Glory of God and in loving memory of George and Rachel Greenhow in 1890. They were given by their daughter Ellen. The plaque commemorating this is in the Chancel of the Church on the wall just beyond the organ.

At present in the tower hangs a ring of 10 bells - a memorial to Edward Beaumont, Vicar of Knottingley 1954 - 1970.

This ring of bells was cast at the Whitechapel Bell Foundry, London in 1995, incorporating the existing Taylor's (of Loughborough) clock-bell, cast in 1926. The ring has been tuned to F#, slightly sharp of Old Concert Pitch.

Each of the nine Whitechapel bells has been named in honour of a Northern Saint, and has on the lower waist a circle of London Pride surmounted by the Whitechapel mark and 1995.

This ring of ten, incorporating the former clock-bell as the ninth, was hung with new fittings and framework in 1995 by The Whitechapel Bell Foundry, London.

Bells - Dedication and inscriptions

Treble       Hugh 1995 (Whitechapel)  
Second   Paulus 1995 (Whitechapel)  
Third   Wilfred 1995 (Whitechapel)  Inscription: 'G. WFM'
 Forth   Hilda 1995 (Whitechapel)   
 Fifth  Ven Bede 1995 (Whitechapel)   
 Sixth  Colman  1995 (Whitechapel)   
 Seventh  Aidan 1995 (Whitechapel)  Inscription:
   

'TO THE GREATER GLORY OF GOD THIS RING WAS GIVEN IN AFFECTIONATE MEMORY OF EDWARD BEAUMONT VICAR OF KNOTTINGLEY 1954 - 1970
HUGH NORCLIFFE LAWRANCE - VICAR
PETE ETHERINGTON }
JUDITH BAKER            }    CHURCH WARDENS'

 Eighth  Cuthbert   1995 (Whitechapel)  
 Ninth   1926 (Taylors)   Inscription:
                                             'TAYLORS 1926 - (bell 201)'
 Tenor  Botolph 1995 (Whitechapel) Inscription
                      'EDWARD HIS PRIEST SINGS PRAISE TO GOD'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diameter, weight and note

Treble        1' 10½''     3cwt 0qr 14lb     A#

Second     1' 11''         3cwt 0qr 25lb    G#

Third          2' 0''           3cwt 2qr 13lb    F#

Fourth        2' 1''           3cwt 2qr 27lb    E#

Fifth           2' 3''           4cwt 1qr 1lb       D#

Sixth          2' 4¾''        4cwt 3qr 0lb      C#

Seventh    2' 7''            5cwt 2qr 27lb    B

Eighth       2' 9''            7cwt 0qr 15lb    A#

Ninth         3' ¾''           9cwt 1qr 27lb    G#

Tenor        3' 4¾''        12cwt 3qr 3lb

Campanology

There are three main types of bell installations:
     Ringing peals of up to twelve bells - When rung by means of ropes and wheels each bell swings a full circle to and fro, the bell being struck once at the end of each swing by the central clapper or tongue.
     Carillons - groups of 25 or more bells fixed rigidly and played from a keyboard by one person.
     Chimes of bells - smaller groups of bells than Carillons but with simpler mechanisms, enabling them to be rung by one person or mechanically.

When a set of bells is chimed the bells do not move but are struck by hammers operated by cords which pass over pulleys to the operating device (or clavier) in a room below the bells.
A ringing peal requires one person for each bell, to control the movement of the rope by which the huge wheel to which it is connected is made to swing the bell.
The sound of bells rung in full peal carries for miles and the full beauty of the tone of the bell is brought out.
It is not possible to 'ring' tunes on a ringing peal, as it is when bells are chimed. This is because of the time of the swing of the bells. The art and science of ringing changes has therefore been developed.
Change ringing is practised only in the British Isles, a few parts of the Commonwealth and USA. Elsewhere, especially on the Continent, carillons and chimes are more common.

 

The Yorkshire Association Of Change Ringers

There are about 250 Churches in Yorkshire with bells that are suitable for Change Ringing. However some are not rung regularly because there are not enough bell ringers.
Ringers come from all walks of life and can be ...
     young or old
     men or women
     boys or girls
     short or tall

There is no need to ...
     be big and strong
     be musical
     buy expensive equipment

The Yorkshire Association of Change Ringers is committed to ...
     keeping our church bell ringing
     helping churches to maintain their bells
     teaching new ringers
     providing opportunities for Yorkshire ringers to meet and ring together

Link to:- The Yorkshire Associations  web site


For more information about ringing at St Botolph's or if you would like to learn to ring :-
contact Paul Hargrave (Tower Captain) 

Bell ringing is good fun!

There are more than 5,000 towers with bells suitable for Change Ringing where you will always be made welcome.

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